Synology RT1900ac Review – Speed Test

Synology RT1900ac: Your network, smart and swift.
Synology RT1900ac: Your network, smart and swift.

The Synology RT1900ac WiFi router is a AC1900 class router that is capable of delivering WiFI speeds of up to 1900 Mbps. This comprise of 600 Mbps on the 2.4 GHz spectrum and 1300 Mbps on the 5 GHz spectrum. In this review, the Synology RT1900ac is subjected to a series of speed tests to see how it performs in real-world scenario.

 

 

How the speed test was conducted?

iperf3 was used to measure the throughput of the Synology RT1900ac. The following iperf3 parameters were used:

Type Command
Uploadiperf3 -c <iperf3 server> -w 640k -P 5 -t 60
Downloadiperf3 -c <iperf3 server> -w 640k -P 5 -t 60 -R

 

The following equipments were involved:

Type Equipment
Router Synology RT1900ac on SRM 1.0-5766
iperf3 server iperf3 server docker container on Synology DS1515+
iperf3 client iMac 27" (mid-2011) with DIR-868L as wireless bridge
Wireless Bridge DIR-868L on TomatoUSB (Shibby)
AC1750 (2.4 GHz: 450 Mbps, 5 GHz: 1300 Mbps)

 

The iperf3 server is connected to the WAN/Internet side of the Synology RT1900ac while the iperf3 client is on the LAN side of the Synology RT1900ac. The wireless client is placed 3 meters away from the Synology RT1900ac.

The speed test for wireless on 2.4 GHz spectrum will be limited to 450 Mbps. Hence, the results might be better with a matched wireless client.

 

WAN-LAN (wired without Traffic Control)

In this test, the Synology RT1900ac managed to clock 938 Mbps and 942 Mbps for upload and download respectively. It is also a baseline test to see if any of the equipments bottlenecks the speed test. All is good!

WAN-to-LAN clocked 942 Mbps with cut-through forwarding (CTF) enabled.
WAN-to-LAN clocked 942 Mbps with cut-through forwarding (CTF) enabled.

LAN-to-WAN clocked 938 Mbps with cut-through forwarding (CTF) enabled.
LAN-to-WAN clocked 938 Mbps with cut-through forwarding (CTF) enabled.

 

Wireless on 5 GHz spectrum

On the 5 GHz wireless, the Synology RT1900ac clocked 344 Mbps and 436 Mbps for upload and download respectively.

5 GHz upload clocked 344 Mbps.
5 GHz upload clocked 344 Mbps.

5 GHz download clocked 436 Mbps.
5 GHz download clocked 436 Mbps.

 

Wireless on 2.4 GHz spectrum

On the 2.4 GHz wireless, the Synology RT1900ac clocked 135 Mbps and 165 Mbps for upload and download respectively. Do note that my wireless client is only capable of 450 Mbps while the Synology RT1900ac is capable of 600 Mbps.

2.4 GHz upload clocked 135 Mbps.
2.4 GHz upload clocked 135 Mbps.

2.4 GHz download clocked 165 Mbps.
2.4 GHz download clocked 165 Mbps.

 

WAN-LAN with (wired with Traffic Control)

The Application Layer Quality of Service disables cut-through forwarding and the CPU crunches through the network packets to assign them to different priority level. In most consumer grade routers, enabling QoS adversely impact the WAN-LAN speeds. For the Synology RT1900ac, it is no different.

When the cut-through forwarding (CTF) is disabled, the Synology RT1900ac clocked 324 Mbps and 566 Mbps for upload and download respectively.

LAN-to-WAN clocked 324 Mbps with cut-through forwarding (CTF) disabled.
LAN-to-WAN clocked 324 Mbps with cut-through forwarding (CTF) disabled.

WAN-to-LAN clocked 566 Mbps with cut-through forwarding (CTF) disabled.
WAN-to-LAN clocked 566 Mbps with cut-through forwarding (CTF) disabled.

 

Speed Test Summary

The results from the speed test are summarised in the table below.

Test Upload (Mbps) Download (Mbps)
Wired (CTF Enabled) 938 942
Wired (CTF Disabled) 324 566
Wireless (2.4 GHz) 135 165
Wireless (5 GHz) 344 436

 

Enabling Traffic Control (or disabling cut-through forwarding) takes a chunk out of the WAN-LAN throughput. However, it is still good enough for your 300 Mbps or 500 Mbps plan. Personally, I don’t think it is necessary to enable traffic control (or QoS) if your Internet plan is blazing fast.

The wireless throughput is pretty decent or I would say it is above average for AC1900 class routers if you look at both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz performance.

7 thoughts on “Synology RT1900ac Review – Speed Test

  • October 27, 2015 at 6:00 am
    Permalink

    in your test summary how do you qualify the wifi as being ” I would say it is above average for AC1900 class routers if you look at both the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz performance.” when your test clearly shows quite slow 5 gig performance when comparing to other wifi tested , testing with ipref is useless in real world as it does not use the same protocols that normal transfers do eg sam / samba , at this stage my finding show quite poor performance both sync wise and throughput wise even at close range , i will say i am awaiting a replacement unit to see if it was a one of or lemon

    pete

  • October 27, 2015 at 7:33 am
    Permalink

    pete,

    You can reference smallnetbuilder’s wireless testing results for various AC1900 routers and see their respective min/avg/max throughput. The results will show that the RT1900ac’s is above average.

    As for the choice of iperf for testing, it is to have a standardise and repeatable mean for testing various routers. Some may argue that samba v2, samba v3 or AFP affect the results and OS X users don’t care about AFP transfer speeds while Windows users don’t care about AFP transfer speed. If I were to do the file transfer test, people might argue that my iMac could handicap samba transfers. The argument would go on and on.

    Hence, my solution is to go for a testing methodology used by most reviewers out there – iperf.

    It is difficult to please every readers.

    By the way, what transfer speed are you getting and what wireless client are you using?

  • October 27, 2015 at 3:30 pm
    Permalink

    hi

    the issue lots of us are seeing is the instability in the 5 gig sync in that its struggling to even get 877M at 3 feet from the test pc

    i have used , asus pce-ac68 , tp link T8E , dlink dwa-192 , asus rt-ac68u in media bridge mode , asus EA-87 in media bridge mode , asus rt-ac87u in media bridge mode all used as clients

    the issue is that i cant get a repeatable set of stats due to the instability of the sync rate and thus the lower throughput

    i use a dedicated NAS connected directly to the router ) in this case the dlink dns-327L ) and transfer read / write wise to a i7 pc connected to the above clients

    see the link below for my other testing results

    http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=2384995

    synology have also admitted they are having issues with the router being able to sync at 1300M and thus results will be effected

    pete

  • October 27, 2015 at 5:19 pm
    Permalink

    pete,

    I used the DIR-868L on TomatoUSB (Shibby). Configured the DIR-868L as a wireless client to the Synology RT1900ac. I did not try out the DWA-192 as my test setup does not have USB 3.0 ports. I did see that the pair managed to sync at 1300M from time to time.

    I am unaware of Synology admitting that their router cannot sync at 1300M though.

    But my test results reflected that I managed to download 3GB of data within 60 seconds over 5GHz spectrum. If it is synced at 866M, the throughput would be a little high. Right?

  • October 28, 2015 at 7:58 pm
    Permalink

    pete,

    I was reading through the thread on Synology RT1900ac on whirlpool forum
    (http://forums.whirlpool.net.au/forum-replies.cfm?t=2456071&p=5) . It seems like there are other users who have synced at 1300M and have similar iperf results to mine on the 5 GHz spectrum. So the testing results on this page is representative of what other users experienced too.

  • October 29, 2015 at 7:28 am
    Permalink

    hi shadowandy

    Don’t feed the troll. He trolled Synology forum and few reviewers even when there are other people who get higher 5g speed.

  • October 30, 2015 at 3:31 pm
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    so just to follow up

    got the second synology and am still seeing quite poor 5 gig performance when compared to others

    below is inssider graph of the synology compared to the asus rt-ac68u and tp link archer C9

    https://onedrive.live.com/?id=7D5CB240BE1A0742!856&cid=7D5CB240BE1A0742&group=0&parId=7D5CB240BE1A0742!144&o=OneUp

    as you can see there is a 10db difference at 25 meters from the router when connected with an asus pce-ac68 , it is the same with other adapters i have as well

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